BEP 175 – English Idioms: Gambling Idioms (Part 1)

This is the first in a two-part Business English Pod series on idioms related to gambling.

As gambling involves money and risk, it’s not surprising that we use gambling idioms in business. The verb “gamble” itself is very common. We often talk about “gambling” money on an idea or “taking a gamble” to mean taking a risk. Another very common one is “bet,” both as a verb and a noun. When we gamble, we “bet” money in the hopes of winning and getting more money back. In a way, business is one big bet.

In English, gambling idioms come from a few common types of gambling. Card games, especially poker, and horse racing give us the most idiomatic expressions, but we also get some from games such as dice and marbles.

In this lesson, we’ll hear a conversation between Kevin and Dan, two colleagues who are talking about investing. Kevin actively invests in the stock market, while Dan is more cautious and usually avoids risk.

Listening Questions

1. Which person thinks that luck is important in investing?
2. What did Kevin do when the stock market crashed?
3. What does Kevin want to tell Dan about at the end of the conversation?

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4 thoughts on “BEP 175 – English Idioms: Gambling Idioms (Part 1)”

  1. It’s a useful website.I know this website via podcast downloaded from iTunes to my iPhone.I just have a minor suggestion that if possible,could you spell vocabularies or new phrases in your podcast clips directly?

  2. Pingback: Gambling Idioms Game | Business English Pod :: Members

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    Creso Castilhos in Dominic Republic.

  4. It’s a useful website.I know this website via podcast downloaded from iTunes to my iPhone.I just have a minor suggestion that if possible, could you spell vocabularies or new phrases in your podcast clips directly?

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