BEP 380 – Videoconferences: Presenting Online (3)

BEP 380 - Presenting Online 3: Managing the Q&A

Welcome back to Business English Pod for today’s lesson on videoconferences and presenting online. Today, we’re going to focus on handling questions and managing the Q&A.

With the rise of hybrid teams, presenting online is just a regular part of work for many professionals. And while the basics of delivering information in a virtual setting may seem simple, interacting with your audience and dealing with questions feels very different online than in person. Skilled presenters have a variety of tricks for ensuring a productive Q&A, or question and answer, session.

For example, when someone asks a good question, you might redirect it to the entire group. That gives the Q&A more of a discussion feel. And if people aren’t asking questions, you can ask some yourself. Of course, sometimes people introduce ideas that you don’t really have time to explore. In this case, you can suggest more discussion at a later time.

Good presenters are also ready to admit any limitations to what they’ve presented. Nobody has all the answers, so don’t pretend you do. And finally, once the Q&A is finished, it’s a great idea to encourage people to follow up with you later if they have any other questions.

In today’s dialog, we’ll listen to the end of a presentation by Adam, a business consultant. He’s handling some questions and encouraging discussion after presenting his ideas on ways to increase sales. We’ll also hear Adam’s colleague Nancy and his boss Heather ask questions and participate in the discussion.

Listening Questions

1. What question does Nancy ask that Adam redirects to the entire group?
2. What question does Adam ask everyone to encourage them to share their ideas?
3. What key point does Adam admit they’re still not sure about?

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BEP 379 – Videoconferences: Presenting Online (2)

BEP 379 - Presenting Online 2: Transitioning to the Q&A

Welcome back to Business English Pod for today’s lesson on videoconferences and presenting online. Today, we’re going to look at how to wrap up your presentation and transition to the Q&A.

Great presenters always make time and space for questions at the end of their presentation. And if you’ve done a good job of engaging your listeners, they may have lots to say or ask. Before you open it up for questions, however, you need to summarize.

One thing you can do to emphasize key points near the end is to ask a question yourself, then answer it. And an effective way to answer it is with a visual or some kind of illustration. That will help your ideas stick, not just at the end, but throughout your presentation.

Near the end of a presentation, there may be people who have to leave early so it’s important to acknowledge these people and let them know how you’ll follow up. Finally, it’s a good idea at the end to summarize your key points. Once you’ve done these things, you can make the transition to the Q&A section of your presentation.

In today’s dialog, we’ll rejoin a presentation by a business consultant named Adam. He’s wrapping up a talk about how the company can increase sales. We’ll hear how Adam finishes up and transitions to the Q&A.

Listening Questions

1. What question does Adam ask his listeners which he then answers by showing a visual?
2. What does Adam offer to do for people who have to leave early?
3. What’s the first big opportunity Adam mentions as he summarizes his presentation?

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BEP 378 – Videoconferences: Presenting Online (1)

BEP 378 - Videoconferences: Presenting Online 1 - Getting Off to a Good Start

Welcome back to Business English Pod for today’s lesson on videoconferences and presenting online. Today, we’re going to focus on how to get your presentation off to a good start.

Videoconferences are now a normal, everyday part of business life. And people have had to develop a new set of skills for this new reality. Consider giving a presentation online. It definitely brings some new challenges, especially technical ones. But virtual presentations also require many of the same skills as presenting in-person.

For example, you still need to be engaging and confident, especially at the start as you get people excited about your presentation. And besides getting them excited, you need to help them understand. So outlining your presentation clearly is also a good idea.

Now, how can you present information and data in a way that keeps your listeners engaged? Well, for one thing, you can talk about your own experience. And you can also relate the information to your listeners’ experience. That will help your presentation connect with your audience. And finally, one technical skill that you’ll need in the virtual format is sharing your screen.

In today’s dialog, we’ll listen to part of an online presentation given by Adam, who works as a business consultant. He’s presenting on the topic of sales to several colleagues, including Chris, Nancy, and his boss Heather. We’ll hear how Adam begins his online presentation.

Listening Questions

1. What is the last thing Adam will do in his presentation, according to his outline?
2. What experience does Adam talk about to ground his presentation?
3. What information does Adam present on his shared screen?

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BEP 375 – Job Interview English: Online Interviews (2)

BEP 375 - Interview English: Online Interview 2

Welcome back to Business English Pod for today’s lesson on doing an online interview in English. Today, we’re going to look at how to talk about a gap in your resume or employment history.

It’s actually not that unusual to have a gap in your resume. Many people get laid off and then spend several months trying to find a new position. Other people have a gap because of family or health issues. And others require time to find a job after relocating.

While a gap in employment isn’t unusual, many job-seekers feel it looks bad and is hard to explain. But it doesn’t have to be. And it doesn’t have to become the only focus of an interview. So how can you ensure a gap doesn’t overshadow your upsides?

For one thing, it’s good to explain a job loss concisely. Secondly, it’s a good idea to show how you developed yourself while you were unemployed. If you can do these things, then you can move on to other aspects of the interview. That might include explaining why you like the company where you’re applying, and asking diplomatically about work flexibility. It may also mean asking for clarification when you don’t understand a question clearly.

In today’s dialog, we’ll continue listening to an online interview with Rachel, who’s applying for an operations manager position at a property management company. In this part of the interview, she has to explain a gap in her employment. Let’s hear how she answers questions and asks some good ones of her own.

Listening Questions

1. What is the basic reason Rachel lost her previous job?
2. How did Rachel develop her skills while unemployed?
3. What two things does Rachel like about the company where she’s applying?

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BEP 374 – Job Interview English: Online Interviews (1)

BEP 374 - Job Interview Online (1)

Welcome back to Business English Pod for today’s lesson on doing an online job interview in English. Today, we’re going to look at some tips for online interviews, especially how to relate your experience to a new field of work.

Just a few years ago, you might have been surprised if a prospective employer requested an online interview. After all, we often think of interviews as a good chance to meet face to face. But these days, in many sectors, online interviews are completely normal. In fact, with the move toward remote work, many newly hired people have never met their colleagues or boss face to face.

This is part of a shake-up in the world of work brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Early in the pandemic, millions of people lost their jobs. Now, more and more of those people are getting hired for new positions, often in different industries. And to get those jobs, they likely had to talk about how they would transfer their experience to a different line of work.

One of the things you’ll have to deal with in an online interview is, of course, possible technical issues. It’s a good idea to be able to deal with such problems calmly and confidently. Another important skill in any interview is talking about how you added value in your previous position.

When it comes to transferring experience, you’ll need to consider how to discuss similarities between the industry you’re leaving and the one you’re hoping to find work in. And given the uncertainty of the pandemic, it’s a good idea to talk about how you’ve adapted to change and demonstrated learning.

In today’s dialog, we’ll listen to part of an online interview for the job of operations manager at a property management company. Rachel is applying for the job after working for many years in operations at a hotel chain. Let’s hear how she answers the interviewer’s questions, deals with technical issues, and talks about transferring her experience.

Listening Questions

1. What accomplishment does Rachel feel demonstrates her value at her last job?
2. What did Rachel focus on during the transition to remote work?
3. What kinds of learning did Rachel focus on in her last job?

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